Indigenous music videos

Monkey Marc has worked with indigenous youth and elders in remote communities around Australia for over 15 years, producing music, mentoring bands and training youth.

The young people participating in video production workshops learn skills around putting a video together from start to finish: from story-boarding and how to portray the story in a video, to filming, directing and editing the footage. Sometimes the people who get involved in making the video aren't the ones who made the track, which widens the reach of the workshops.

Only a small portion of the music from these community projects gets made into music videos, but it is an important part of the process. Locally-made music is popular, but when the music is made into videos, it garners even more community interest and is shared more widely.

YouTube views don’t always represent how popular the videos are within the local communities. Some of the communities are too remote for mobile phone reception, but a lot of people still have mobile phones. Instead of sharing via the internet, the video files often spread rapidly by sharing via Bluetooth from phone to phone to become a local community hit.

The music videos can have a huge impact on the communities by promoting positive role models and spreading positive messages of youth and culture.

( Community programs )

The following videos are a selection of the many videos have been produced for different indigenous community projects over the past five to ten years.

Some were created as part of the Barkly Regional Council's youth diversion program, Barkly Desert Cultures, which is a music mentoring and multimedia program with young people across the Barkly region of the Northern Territory in Australia. The project has been curated by Sean Spencer.

Other clips have been produced through NARIS (National Association of Remote Indigenous Schools), InCite Youth Arts, the Mt Theo Program, and Blaktraks, an urban indigenous youth arts project. Blaktraks encourages urban indigenous youth tell their story and their view of self, family, community, culture and society, by recording their stories in music and film.

Desert Sevens, Ampilatwatja, NT.

Desert Sevens, Ampilatwatja, NT.

 

Music videos

( Make the change )

This is a track from Ampilatwatja's hip hop crew, the Desert Sevens (D7's). The music and the film clip was shot as part of Barkly Desert Cultures. Monkey Marc tuition and production, Sean Spencer on video production.

( Where you going )

This film clip is from Ali Curung, also from the Barkly Desert Cultures program. Monkey Marc trained and mentored the young men on music production and recording techniques for eight weeks in Ali Curung. Leo Ortega worked as the film producer and mentor on this film clip.

( Bikey boys from Nyirripi )

Filmed in Nyirripi, Northern Territory. Workshops with Monkey Marc and Elf Tranzporter in March 2011. Funded by InCite Youth Arts & Mt. Theo. Our most viral video to date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

( Kids on the run )

This film clip is from Ali Curung, also from the Barkly Desert Cultures program. Monkey Marc trained and mentored the young men on music production and recording techniques for eight weeks in Ali Curung. Leo Ortega worked as the film producer and mentor on this film clip.

 

( It's your turn )

This song was produced by Monkey Marc and Elf Tranzporter with students from five indigenous schools around Australia: Arlparra (NT), Mimili (SA), Yarrabah (QLD), Wilcannia (NSW) and Nullagine (WA).

It was commissioned by NARIS (the National Association of Remote Indigenous Schools) and InCite Youth Arts, to encourage young indigenous students to consider teaching as a career. With the guidance of the elders in the community, the song incorporates five native languages from these communities.

 

( Go to school )

This clip was made with the young fellas from Elliott School. Thanks to the school for all the support on this one. Produced for the Barkly Desert Cultures program. Monkey Marc trained and mentored the young men on music production and recording techniques. Video clip by Sean Spencer.

 

( Goanna dreaming )

A short film from the Barkly Desert Cultures project of a Goanna Dreaming story from the Elliott region in the NT. Music by Marc Peckham, film by Sean Spencer.

 

 

 

 

( Take a minute to think )

This film clip is about the effects of drink driving on the community. It was created in Elliott as part of the Barkly Desert Cultures, 2014. Monkey Marc worked with the young men and Beatrice Lewis worked with the young women to create the music for this song. Sean Spencer produced the film clip together with the young people of Elliott.

 

 

 

 

( Stop the violence )

This song and video clip was inspired by a community meeting about domestic violence. After the meeting, the fellas wrote this with Monkey Marc, and Sean Spencer produced the film.

Part of the Desert Cultures program by the Barkly Regional Council.

 

 

 

 

( goanna dreaming )

This song was recorded and filmed in Elliott, NT, November 2014, as part of the Barkly Desert Cultures program. This story was originally recorded as a spoken word piece, then adapted into this song version. This is a great way for the younger generations to learn and re-learn traditional stories, keeping the stories alive and relevant for the younger generations.

( Grandfather, teach me more dreaming )

This music video was the result of a workshop in Punmu community with Monkey Marc, Ozi Batla (Shannon Kennedy), and Enda Murray (Virus Media).

( Wis Way )

My name is Tobi, I'm sixteen, and I'm a proud Torres Straits girl from Darnley Island. My film is about missing the islands and my family.

Produced for the Blaktraks Youth Arts Program.

( When things go wrong )

My name is Sonny Trindall. My song is about how I grew up and how you can still be alright despite the stuff that has happened to you.

Produced for the Blaktraks Youth Arts Program.

( That's where we're at )

Produced in a hip hop music and dance workshop in Weipa, Queensland, with kids from Arakoon. Workshop run by Monkey Marc, Elf Tranzporter, Joh Fairley & Carolyn Perry.